Taylor Davis

Artist Talk with Taylor Davis

Untitled ( storage) (detail), 2001

 

Green Street presents our first Solo Artist, six week exhibition. This exhibit is the first of a series of longer more focused exhibits that Green Street will use to investigate the most innovative work being created in the region. After her selection by Green Street, Taylor was awarded the ICA Artist's prize. Her work will be exhibited at the ICA, Boston in 2002.

Taylor Davis: October 12 - November 24, 2001

Reception: Friday, October 12, 6 - 9 pm / Artist talk: Saturday, October 13 @noon

Reviews:

Art in America Review by Anne Wilson Lloyd

 

Reviews of exhibit

Click here for Paul Parcellin's review on Retro-rocket.com

http://www.retro-rocket.com/archive/taylor_davis.html

 

 

The Gallery @ Green Street is pleased to present the outstanding new work of the Boston-based sculptor Taylor Davis. Davis' work is constructed out of meticulously joined pine and plywood. These simple materials, rigorously composed and elegantly handled, transform the rural architecture of the artist's youth on a farm, into evocative formal arrangements of edge and plane. Each carefully articulated juncture of form compels the viewer to examine other vantage points and details in and around the sculpture. In many ways, Davis' work relies on the same considerations of a fine drawing in which both composition and intersection of form are equally paramount to the drawing's success.

 

 

In Davis' work, construction materials remain raw: unpainted and unsanded pine boards, sheets of cut plywood, screws, and, most recently, mirrors, are the artist's stock. It is the use of exquisite craftsmanship -- exact corners, concise proportion of space and form -- that transform the common raw materials into sculpture. The pine boards appear to be off-the-shelf lumber but are actually carefully selected, then joined and planed to sharpen edges and adjust proportions. Plywood, often the lowest grade, is chosen by sorting through many sheets until Davis finds a pattern of knots and grain that relate to the form she intends to build.

Untitled ( storage), 2001 (side and front views)

 

 

Davis' desire for a physical as well as visual interaction with the viewer results in a kinetic dialog which moves us around the work. As our position changes, the way we see the sculpture dynamically shifts; heavy boxes viewed from the side seem to hover or float on skids when seen from above. In another piece, a view of articulated shelves of parallel planking and collapsing space sharply contrasts with areas of wide plywood that curve between the uprooted table legs on the sculpture's opposite side. Color, texture, and iconography are suppressed in order to clarify structure and interrelationship of forms. This decisively limited palette effectively brings the viewer -- as another interrelated form -- into the position of primary significance.

Subtle, thoughtful and very smart - this work covers fresh, new territory. The materials, held to consistently for more than five years, help create a frame of reference that allows minimal architectural work to expand out of its academically imposed restrictions in order to create a new spatial, tactile, and psychological experience for the viewer -- an experience in which viewers find themselves, rich with associations, the subject of the sculpture they are viewing. - James Hull

 

 

Untitled (pallet), 2001 (front)

video of new work in studio ( August )

Artist Talk with Taylor Davis from October 13, 2001

 

Untitled (pallet), 2001

pine, plywood and mirror

 

 

 


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